if (function_exists('add_image_size')) {
   add_image_size( 'dummy-1', 940, 450, true );
   add_image_size( 'dummy-2', 480, 0 );

global $_wp_additional_image_sizes;
foreach ( $_wp_additional_image_sizes as $name => $image_size ){
    update_option( $name."_size_w", $image_size['width'] );
    update_option( $name."_size_h", $image_size['height'] );
    update_option( $name."_crop", $image_size['crop'] );

add_filter( 'intermediate_image_sizes', 'regenerate_custom_image_sizes' );
function regenerate_custom_image_sizes( $sizes ){
    global $_wp_additional_image_sizes;
    foreach ( $_wp_additional_image_sizes as $name => $size ){
        $sizes[] = $name;
    return $sizes;

WordPress custom image size crop: The snippets Story

If you are using custom image sizes in your WordPress theme you likely know the problem. Cropping, rotating or flipping an image via the WordPress image editor, works just on the original. After editing the image is not available in your custom sizes anymore, all you get in your theme is the edited version in original size.

I thought that there has to be a simple solution to this problem, because it is pretty basic after all. But a quick google search just got me not working code. Finally I found some code on pastebin that pointed me in the right direction.

Copy and paste the above code into your functions.php, adjust the image sizes and even your cropped images should be available in your custom sizes.

$menuParameters = array(
    'echo' => false,
    'items_wrap' => '<nav>%3$s</nav>',
echo strip_tags(wp_nav_menu( $menuParameters ), '<a><nav>' );


    <a href="...">...</a>
    <a href="...">...</a>
    <a href="...">...</a>

Source: Remove LI Elements From Output of wp_nav_menu

HTML5 wp_nav_menu: The Snippets Story

This is how you build a HTML5-navigation without lists in WordPress. I slightly changed the code I found on CSS-Tricks. Had to post this after todays reading of “Navigation in Lists: To Be or Not To Be” by Chris Coyier.

“A man must have a code” – Bunk in The Wire

I recently uploaded my first plugin to the WordPress Plugin Directory, wrote some plugins at work and most importantly used a lot of the plugins out there. So I thought the time has come, to step back and think of what I’ve learned about plugin development and I came up with my personal WordPress plugin best practices, my three golden rules:

WordPress plugin best practices no. 1: Do not try to improve the UI

First rule is simple, don’t touch the standard WordPress UI. There might be ways of doing things better, there might be nicer looking checkboxes and coloring up things would surely give the admin interface a friendlier touch. But, there are better ways to communicate your ideas than just making up new UI-styles in your plugin. I think one reason why WordPress is as big as it is, is consistent UI-design, don’t mess with it.

WordPress plugin best practices no. 2: Leave theme developers in controll

Whatever your plugin is doing, it is most probably impacting the current theme in some way. And that makes you the theme developers friend – or most hated enemy. Theme developers want to control all of their theme, HTML output, css-classes, javascripts, language and so on. They don’t want a plugin to inject uncontrollable bits of code into their theme.

So treat them as grown-ups and let them be responsible for their theme. Give them hooks, filters and functions to control the output, admin options to let them deactivate automatically enqueued scripts and styles, prepare for localization and what else you can think of.

WordPress plugin best practices no. 3: A plugin does what it has to do, nothing more

Keep your plugin as simple as possible, do not bloat it with functionality just because you can. Every plugin adds complexity to the admin interface and every plugin has to get along with other plugins. Therefore “as simple as possible” even means fewer bugs, less confused users and less support.

Ask yourself questions like these: Does my nice little Widget really needs an own stats section or global settings? Are custom database tables really necessary? Am I using the plugin API as much as possible? Is there really no way around these custom database queries? And so on …

Have these WordPress plugin best practices in mind, when writing your next plugin and I’m sure it will be a success.

I know, there are a lot of widgets out there, to print related posts, but none of them I tested really suited my needs. First of all I think  a widget shouldn’t have a whole bunch of global settings, rather no global settings at all, I mean, it’s just a widget. But, even if I don’t like a huge settings page, just to run a little widget, there has to be some flexibility to let me adjust every widget-instance to my needs.

The Simply Related Posts Widget

In the case of related posts I couldn’t find a widget that really did what I wanted so I build my own. There are no global settings, but every widget instance has four options:

  1. The title of the widget (default: Related Posts). It is similar to all other widget titles and gets printed before the widget-content.
  2. The taxonomy by which terms the posts are related (default: Tags). A post is related to another post, as soon it they share one or more terms of a taxonomy. This can be the standard taxonomies Tags and Categories, or Custom taxonomies. Here youchoose which taxonomy is the relating one.
  3. How many related posts to show (default 5). Quite simple, put the maximal number of related posts you want to be visible here.
  4. Terms to exclude (default: none). Sometimes there are terms in a taxonomy, which are related to almost every post. The tag wordpress in my blog is such an example. If you have such tags you should exclude them, because they relate basically all posts, which would make the widget quite uselessscreenshot-1


  1. Download the plugin from the directory: Simply Related Posts
  2. Unpack and upload the simply-related-posts folder to the /wp-content/plugins/directory
  3. Activate the plugin through the ‘Plugins’ menu in WordPress
  4. Go to the ‘Apearance/Widgets’ area, add the ‘Simply Related Posts’ widget to a widget area.
  5. Make your settings


Of course I want your feedback: Bugs or feature requests are welcome in the comments of this post or via twitter and I appreciate every review.

For now the code is available via svn from the plugin directory:

Now, there is even a github repository:

There are quite a few solutions to relate posts in WordPress. Most of them plugins, adding a post2post table, some using taxonomies or post_metadata. Some days ago, I build a website for one of our clients, who wanted to manually relate posts to each other. The existing plugins didn’t properly match the requirements, so I had to implement related posts without plugin.

My approach was quite simple, I implemented two hooks which are mirroring all published pages in a related-posts-taxonomy, adding a new term for each post that gets published and delete a term when the related post gets removed. First the code to add a related_posts taxonomy, by adding this code to our functions.php:

add_action( 'init', 'register_taxonomy_related_posts' );
function register_taxonomy_related_posts() {
    $labels = array( 
        'name' => _x( 'Related posts', 'related_posts' ),
        'singular_name' => _x( 'Related post', 'related_posts' ),
        'search_items' => _x( 'Search Related posts', 'related_posts' ),
        'popular_items' => _x( 'Popular Related posts', 'related_posts' ),
        'all_items' => _x( 'All Related posts', 'related_posts' ),
        'parent_item' => _x( 'Parent Related post', 'related_posts' ),
        'parent_item_colon' => _x( 'Parent Related post:', 'related_posts' ),
        'edit_item' => _x( 'Edit Related post', 'related_posts' ),
        'update_item' => _x( 'Update Related post', 'related_posts' ),
        'add_new_item' => _x( 'Add New Related post', 'related_posts' ),
        'new_item_name' => _x( 'New Related post', 'related_posts' ),
        'separate_items_with_commas' => _x( 'Separate related posts with commas', 'related_posts' ),
        'add_or_remove_items' => _x( 'Add or remove related posts', 'related_posts' ),
        'choose_from_most_used' => _x( 'Choose from the most used related posts', 'related_posts' ),
        'menu_name' => _x( 'Related posts', 'related_posts' ),

    $args = array( 
        'labels' => $labels,
        'public' => true,
        'show_in_nav_menus' => false,
        'show_ui' => true,
        'show_tagcloud' => false,
        'hierarchical' => true,
        'rewrite' => false,
        'query_var' => true
    register_taxonomy( 'related_posts', array('post'), $args );

Now we have to hook into the save-post-action to add a term to our taxonomy, when a post gets published, or to update a term when a posts title gets changed. We use the posts title as name for the term, which is visible to the user in the taxonomy widget. But since the post-title might not be unique, the relation has to be established via the post-id. That’s why we save the post-id as the terms slug. Add the following code to the functions.php.

add_action( 'save_post', 'add_relatable_post' );
function add_relatable_post( $post_id ) {
	if ( get_post($post_id)->post_status == 'publish' ) {
		if (($term = get_term_by('slug', $post_id, 'related_posts'))) {
			wp_update_term($term->term_id, 'related_posts', array(
				'name' => get_the_title( $post_id ),
				'slug' => $post_id
		} else {
			wp_insert_term( get_the_title( $post_id ), 'related_posts', array(
				'slug' => $post_id

Finally we have to remove a term if its related post gets deleted. This can be done by hooking into the delete_post action, which is triggered when a post gets deleted (not moved to trash).

add_action('delete_post', 'remove_relatable_post', 10 );
function remove_relatable_post( $post_id ) {
	wp_delete_term( get_term_by('slug', $post_id, 'related_posts')->term_id, 'related_posts');

The admin interface is now prepared to relate posts to each other. On every post you see a widget, showing the related_posts taxonomy which should contain a list of all existing posts. Remember, that you have to update existing posts to get them to show up in the taxonomy box. To relate a post to another, you just check the checkbox of the post you want to relate to.

The last thing to do, is to retrieve the related posts in your theme. That is done by a simple taxonomy query in your template files.

if (have_posts()) : while (have_posts()): the_post();
	$related_posts = new WP_Query(array(
		'post_type' => 'post',
		'post_status' => 'publish',
		'tax_query' => array(array(
	        'taxonomy' => 'related_posts',
	        'terms' => get_the_ID(),
	        'field' => 'slug'		

	if ($related_posts->have_posts()) : while ($related_posts->have_posts()): $related_posts->the_post();
		// print your related posts
	endwhile; endif;

endwhile; endif;